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Roll of Honour (J to O)



  Able Seaman Roy W KILNER (          )
Royal Naval Division

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 
 

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  Private Arthur G KILNER (         )
Royal Air Force

Born: 
Died:  (Age )


 


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  Driver Albert KIRKLAND (M/205835)
Army Service Corps

Born: Abt Mar 1888, Beckstones, Patterdale, Westmorland
Died: Abt Sep 1951, Birkenhead, Cheshire (Age 63)
Albert Kirkland was the second youngest of 9 children born to William Kirkland, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Emma (nee Woof). He was baptised at St Patrick's Church, Patterdale on the 22nd April 1888. His parents had met when they were both working as servants for Mrs. Dowson at Matterdale End in the early 1870s but had moved to Hesket Newmarket by the time they married in Caldbeck on the 23rd of August 1873. Their time there was short and the family moved back to Matterdale in 1874 and then on to Patterdale around 1885. By the time Albert was born in 1888, they were living at Beckstones Farm. Albert's father died in September 1896 and is buried in the graveyard at St Patrick's Church. By 1901, Albert was living at Deepdale Bridge with his widowed mother, his younger brother Frederick and nephew Percy (the illegitimate son of their sister Mary Ann), who would have been attending Patterdale School.

At some point Albert left the Dale and by 1911 we find him working as a Chauffeur to a Widow in Bebington, Cheshire. It was whilst there that he met and married, on the 1st November 1911, Ethel White Edwards, the daughter of John Edwards. We know that Albert and Ethel had three children; Alfred E, born about May 1912 but who sadly died around July 1914, George born on the 10th September 1913 and Frank also born on the 10th September in 1915. (Alfred's discharge papers record both the 10th September dates).

Albert enlisted at Birkenhead on the 11th December 1915 almost certainly under the Derby Scheme (which promised deferral for older and married volunteers, prior to conscription being introduced). He stated that he was married with two children, worked as a “motor mechanic” and lived at number 70, The Woodlands, Birkenhead. He was therefore placed on the Reserve list. when. He was eventually mobilised in the Army Service Corps on the 9th December 1916 and sent to their main depot at Grove Park and within days passed his 'Learners Test' which qualified him as a Military Transport Driver. We believe he was posted to Egypt in February 1917 where he was assigned to various Motor Transport (MT) Companies. His conduct was generally assessed as 'Good' but one Major, in 347 MT Coy, noted that Albert 'Never did a stroke of work'! Whilst serving in Egypt, Alfred would have received word that his brother Frederick had died in Flanders on the 31st March 1918. Albert was discharged from the Army on the 30th August 1919 and qualified for a 'Disablement' Class 5 pension, as he had contracted Malaria during his time in Egypt.

  Research Documents:
    Census Returns: 18911901, 1911
    Service Records: 12 Pages
    Medal Card
    Parish Registers



  Private Ernest KIRKLAND (          )
Army Service Corps

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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Driver Frederick KIRKLAND (M2/104268)
Army Service Corps

Born: 13 Jul 1892, Hartsop, Westmorland
Died: 31 Mar 1918, The Somme, France (Age 25 )


Frederick Kirkland was born on the 13th July 1892, in Hartsop, he was the youngest of 9 children born to William Kirkland, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Emma (nee Woof). His parents had met when they were both working as servants for Mrs. Dowson at Matterdale End in the early 1870s but had moved to Hesket Newmarket by the time they married in Caldbeck on the 23rd of August 1873. Their time there was short and the family moved back to Matterdale in 1874 and then on to Patterdale around 1885. By the time Frederick was born in 1892, they were living in Hartsop. Fred's father died in September 1896 and is buried in the graveyard at St Patrick's Church, Patterdale. By 1901, Fred, his older brother Albert and nephew Percy (the illegitimate son of their sister Mary Ann) were living at Deepdale Bridge with their widowed mother and attending Patterdale School.

Fred had left home by 1911 and was working as a Horseman at Wreay Farm, Watermillock but later, before the outbreak of war, he got a job driving the mail motor bus which Messrs Taylor Motors Ltd ran between Penrith and Patterdale, so may well have been living with his mother who by then had moved to 25 Duke Street in Penrith.

Fred enlisted early in the war and with his pre-war experience of driving a motor-bus, joined the Mechanical Transport section of the Army Service Corps. He arrived in France on the 16th July 1915.  We know that before he died he was an ambulance driver, presumably motorised, with the 43rd Field Ambulance (Royal Army Medical Corps.) who were attached to the 14th (Light) Division. This would have been quite a specialist role at the time as there was still a great reliance on horse drawn wagons. 

We know very little about the circumstances of his wounding or where he died and sadly this was probably the same for his mother (unless she received any unpublished letter from his unit). However, we do know that the 14th (Light) Division were involved in the Battle of St Quentin, part of he German Spring offensive which began on the 21st March 1918. The Division suffered very severe casualties in this battle, losing almost 6,000 troops and the Artillery Brigades lost all of their guns. Ambulances and medics must have been very busy and it seems likely that Fred was wounded whilst transporting casualties from the front line. He died from his wounds on the 31st March 1931 and is buried in the St. Sever Cemetery Extension in Rouen. 

Fred had spent over two and a half years in France and as an ambulance driver must have seen some terrible things. His medal card shows that he was posthumously awarded the Victory Medal, British War Medal and the 1915 Star. 

  For Research Documents and a more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here



  Lance Corporal Joseph KIRKLAND (P/10447)
Royal Welch Fusiliers; Cheshire Regiment;
Royal Military Foot Police 

Born: Nov 1880, Matterdale, Cumberland

Died: 6 Mar 1959, Penrith, Westmorland (Age 78)
 


 
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  Driver Newton KIRKUP (          )
Royal Field Artillery

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private George KIRKUP (          )
Border Regiment

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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Private Ernest LAKE (17524)
2nd Bn. Coldstream Guards

Born: Abt May 1889, Patterdale Westmorland
Died: 2 Aug 1917, Dozingham, Belgium (Age 28)


 
Born around May 1889 in the Parish of Patterdale, Ernest Lake was the eldest son of John and Christiana Lake (nee Oglethorpe and daughter of a Mining Agent). His father had been born in Devon but came with his parents to Glenridding around 1870 to work as Lead Miners at the Greenside Mine. John and Christiana lived in Glenridding, so Ernest would have attended school in Patterdale. By 1911, aged 21 years, Ernest was working as an Ore Dresser, so becoming the third generation of Lakes to work at Greenside. His mother, a widow since March 1906, was running a boarding house at Bridge House in Glenridding. Prior to joining the army, Ernest had left Glenridding and was working as a miner in Scotland. However, he must have stayed in contact with his pals in the village because, in early December 1915, both he and George Cooper enlisted together in the 2nd Battalion of the Coldstream Guards (Ernest’s service number of 17524 comes just after that of George 17523). 

Ernest would have received his basic training at the Battalion’s barracks in Windsor before being posted to the front in the spring of 1916. During the latter part of July 1917 the 2nd Battalion were billeted close to Herzeele (about 20 miles west of Ypres), where they underwent training for their part in a major allied offensive planned to begin on the 31st July that would later become known as the Battle of Passchendaele. Their objective was to cross the Yser Canal and then the Steenbeek Stream to take the Pilkem ridge thereby eliminating the Ypres Salient, the vulnerable bulge of allied-held ground that was surrounded on three sides by German forces. At dawn, on the 31st July, the Battalion advanced and crossed the Yser Canal using improvised bridges. As they advanced closer to their objective, the shell fire became heavier and machine guns started to inflict casualties. The attack was going to plan with the 2nd Coldstreams joining up with the 2nd Grenadiers and beginning to consolidate their position. Unfortunately at this point a German airman flew very low (100ft) over the Battalion in a captured English plane with a black cross painted very indistinctly. There position was therefore given away and a very accurate artillery fire soon followed causing many casualties. Ernest was acting as a stretcher bearer when he was wounded. He was taken to the Casualty Clearing Station at Dozingham but sadly died of his wounds two days later on the 2nd August 1917. He is buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery in Belgium.

Ernest had served with The Coldstream Guards in Flanders for around one and a half years and his medal card3 shows that he was posthumously awarded the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 


     For Research Documents and a more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here



  Private Herbert LAKE (         )


Born: 24 May 1893, Glenridding, Westmorland
Died: Abt Nov 1981, Lancaster, Lancashire (Age 88)


Herbert Lake was a son of Richard Lake, a Miner at Greenside, and Eve (nee Pattinson) who lived at 3 High Rake, Glenridding. Both his parents were born in Glenridding. Richard was the brother of John Lake (father of Ernest Lake above), and Eve was the cousin of Abraham Pattinson. Richard worked at the Greenside Mine like his brother and father. Herbert was one of 7 children; alongside his older sister Sarah Jane (born 1890), older brother John Joseph (1891), younger sister Marian (1895), and younger brothers William (1897), Edward (1902), and Thomas Alfred (1907). The children would all have attended Patterdale School.

Their father Richard died in 1910, at the age of 50, and was buried in St Patrick's Churchyard on the 11th October. When the census was taken in April 1911, Eve was still living in Glenridding at 3 High Rake with John Joseph and 17 year old Herbert - who were both working as Lead Miners at Greenside, and Marian, William, Edward and Thomas who were still at school. Eldest daughter Sarah Jane had moved away and was living as a boarder in Darwen Lancashire.

We know that Herbert served in the war as his name is listed on the Glenridding Roll of Honour but for some reason there is no regiment listed against his name. In the 1911 census, there are at least six individuals, of a suitable age for military service, with the name Herbert Lake. There are also twelve medal cards for servicemen with that name, so we cannot be sure which would be 'our' Herbert. By 1917 the rest of the family had moved to Whitehaven, where Eve remarried. Her new husband was George Joyce, who in 1911 had been working at Greenside and living with Joseph and Rachel Cooper at Low Glenridding.
 
  Research Documents:
    Census Returns: 1901, 1911
    Wesleyan Baptism Register for Patterdale



  Private William LAKE (307037 & 593949)
Lancashire Fusiliers then Labour Corps.

Born: 12 Aug 1897, Glenridding, Westmorland
Died:  Jun 1989, Blackpool, Lancashire (Age 91)

 
William Lake was a son of Richard Lake, a Miner at Greenside, and Eve (nee Pattinson) who lived at 3 High Rake, Glenridding. Both his parents were born in Glenridding. Richard was the brother of John Lake (father of Ernest Lake above), and Eve was the cousin of Abraham Pattinson. Richard worked at the Greenside Mine like his brother and father. William was one of 7 children; alongside his older sisters Sarah Jane (born 1890) and Marian (1895), older brothers John Joseph (1891) and Herbert (1893), and younger brothers Edward (1902), and Thomas Alfred (1907). William was baptised at the Methodist Chapel in Patterdale, on 19th September 1897. The children would all have attended Patterdale School.

We know from the Glenridding Roll of Honour that he joined the Lancashire Fusiliers and from his medal card that he was awarded the Victory Medal and British War Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914 or 1915 Star, we know that he didn't enter a theatre of war in either of those years, so he probably enlisted during 1915 and mobilised in 1916. We do not know which Battalion he joined but as the Lancashire Fusiliers had eleven Battalions in the Battle of the Somme (Jul - Nov 1916), it seems very likely that William saw action on the Western Front. His medal card shows that he was transferred at some point into the Labour Corps. The Labour Corps was formed in January 1917 to carry out vital work in support of the regular infantry battalions and many of the men had previously been wounded in action. Unfortunately, without details of William's service record we have no way of knowing where he served or why he ended up in the Labour Corps.

After the war, we believe that William moved to the Blackburn area of Lancashire (his older sister Sarah Jane had gone there in 1911 and his younger brother Thomas Alfred married there in 1936, so there was a family link with that area). William married Lydia Ethel Barker in Blackburn in June 1924. They were still living there when Lydia died (aged 77) around February 1971. William died in Blackpool around May 1989 at the grand age of 91.
 
  Research Documents:
    Census Returns: 19011911
    Medal Card
    Wesleyan Baptism Register for Patterdale



  Captain Alex S LANCASTER (          )
1st London Regiment

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Trooper John E LANCASTER (          )
Westmorland & Cumberland Yeomanry

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private John LANCASTER (         )
Honourable Artillery Company

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private Thomas LEWTHWAITE (          )
Border Regiment

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private Alfred LEWTHWAITE (          )
Border Regiment

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private George LEWTHWAITE (         )
Border Regiment

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Died:  (Age )

   

 
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  Private Ernest William MARR (4902201)
12th Coy. 161st Depot Brigade, US Army

Born: 16 Jul 1893, Patterdale, Westmorland
Died: 25 Mar 1954, Michigan, USA (Age 60)
 

Ernest William Marr was the second son of Thomas Linton Marr, a lead miner, and his wife Jane (nee Potts) and was baptised at St Patrick's Church on the 3rd September 1893. In 1901 the family were living at 4 Middle Rake in Glenridding, with his father working as a Lead Ore Smelter at Greenside. Ernest was one of four children, his siblings were; Leonard Stephen (1890-1972), Henrietta Francesca who sadly died in infancy (1898-1898) and Sidney (1900).

After attending Patterdale School Ernest started working at the Greenside Mine, alongside his father and older brother, as a 'Stationary Engine-man below Ground', which meant that he was working one of the winding machines at the mine. By 1911, the family were living at 8 Glenridding in Glenridding.

In 1913 Leonard and Ernest decided to emigrate to America. On the 10th May they boarded the SS Mauretania in Liverpool for the 6 day crossing to New York. Upon their arrival at Ellis Island on the 16th May, they gave their final destination as Cuba City, Wisconsin, an area with several lead mines and just a few miles from Benton where their school-friends James Bowman and Joseph Lawrence Graham would head for in 1914. It is quite likely that Leonard and Ernest would have been there when Jim and Joe arrived. Ernest returned to Patterdale at some point, probably in 1916, as we have found him, along with his younger brother Sidney, on the passenger list of the SS St Paul, which departed Liverpool on the 30th December 1916 and arrived at Ellis Island, New York on the 9th January 1917.

On 6th April 1917, the USA declared war on Germany and officially entered World War I. Six weeks later, the Selective Service Act was passed, which authorized the President to increase the military establishment of the United States. As a result, every male living within the United States, between the ages of 18 and 45, was required to register for the draft. Ernest completed his Draft Registration Card on the 5th June 1917, in which he gave his address as Benton, Wisconsin, and his occupation as an Assay Laboratory Assistant with A H Brainerd in Benton. Only a small percentage of the men who registered were actually called up for military service. However, thanks to a form completed by his widow in 1954, for a veterans headstone, we know that he was 'called up' on the 30th August 1918 and assigned to 12th Company, 1st Provisional Training Regiment, 161st Depot Brigade. This Brigade was based at Camp Grant in Rockford, Illinois, for the purpose of training infantry. In May 1918, in recognition of the large number of non-citizens on active duty, Congress amended the nation’s naturalization laws to allow alien soldiers to fast-track the citizenship process and so Ernest was granted US Citizenship on the 26th September 1918. Ernest would only have been in training for 10 weeks when the war ended on the 11th November 1918, so it seems very unlikely that he served overseas or awarded any medals. He was honourably discharged on the 17th January 1919. The Glenridding Roll of Honour lists him as a Lance Corporal but the veterans gravestone form confirms that he remained a Private.

After he was discharged, it appears that he joined his brother Leonard in Detroit. However, on the 1st April 1919 Ernest applied for a US Passport so that could return to England temporarily to 'help sick parents', who had moved to Barrow in Furness when the war began, so that Thomas could work at the Vickers Armaments Factory. Both he and Sidney sailed from Quebec on board the SS Melita arriving in Liverpool on the 31st July 1919. They stayed in England for almost a year before the whole family, parents Thomas and Jane, Ernest and Sidney sailed back to America on board the SS Aquitania, arriving at Ellis Island in New York on the 24th July 1920. They headed to Detroit to stay with Leonard and Naomi for a time. Ernest and his father then got employment, alongside Leonard, working for the Ford Motor Company in Detroit. Sadly, his father Thomas died in Detroit on the 28th December 1923 - he is remembered on the gravestone of Ann Marr, Thomas's mother, in St Patrick's Churchyard.

In 1930 Ernest was still working at a car plant in Detroit, was married to Mary P (who was born in Michigan to Swedish parents) and had a young daughter, Gladys. When the 1940 census was taken, they had a second daughter named Rubie. In April 1942, like his brothers Leonard and Sidney, Ernest was required to fill in a WW2 Draft Registration card. From this we know that he was living at 1017 Adeline Street, Detroit, Michigan and working for the Detroit Gear and Machine Company in Wayne, Michigan.

Ernest died on the 25th March 1954, and, as mentioned earlier, his widow Mary, still living at 1017 Adeline Drive, applied for Ernest to have a US Veterans Gravestone. This was approved and marks his grave at the Roseland Park Cemetery, Berkley, Oakland County in Michigan. We believe his wife Mary died on the 4th January 1985 at the age of 84, whilst still living in Detroit.
 
  Research Documents:
    Census Returns:  1901, 1911, 1930, 1940
    Baptism Register (Entry 506)
    Atlantic Crossings (1913 to 1920)
    US WW1 Draft Registration Card - 5 Jun 1917
    US Passport Application - 11 Apr 1919
    US WW2 Draft Registration Card - 27 Apr 1942
    Application for a Veterans Gravestone - 12 May 1954



  Corporal Leonard Stephen MARR (   ?     )
U. S. Army

Born: 13 Jan 1890, Tirril, Westmorland
Died: 17 Dec 1972, Wayne, Michigan, USA (Age 82)
 

Leonard Stephen Marr was the eldest son of Thomas Linton Marr, a lead miner, and his wife Jane (nee Potts). In 1891, the family were living at Blowick, alongside the Slee family. By 1901 they had moved to 4 Middle Rake in Glenridding, with his father now working as a Lead Ore Smelter at Greenside.  Leonard was one of four children, his siblings were;
Ernest William (1893), Henrietta Francesca who sadly died in infancy (1898-1898) and Sidney (1900).

After attending Patterdale School Leonard started working alongside his father at Greenside Mine and by 1911 his younger brother Ernest was also working there as a 'Stationary Engine-man below Ground', which meant that he was working one of the winding machines at the mine. At this point the family were living at 'Number 8 Glenridding'.

In 1913 Leonard and Ernest decided to emigrate to America. On the 10th May they boarded the SS Mauretania in Liverpool for the 6 day crossing to New York. Upon their arrival at Ellis Island on the 16th May, they gave their final destination as Cuba City, Wisconsin, an area with several lead mines and just a few miles from Benton where their school-friends James Bowman and Joseph Lawrence Graham would head for in 1914. It is quite likely that Leonard and Ernest would have been there when Jim and Joe arrived. However, Leonard had moved to Idaho sometime before 1917.

On 6th April 1917, the USA declared war on Germany and officially entered World War I. Six weeks later, the Selective Service Act was passed, which authorized the President to increase the military establishment of the United States. As a result, every male living within the United States, between the ages of 18 and 45, was required to register for the draft. Leonard completed his Draft Registration Card on the 5th June 1917, in which he gave his address as Mullan, Idaho, and his occupation as a Mine Foreman with the Reindeer Queen Mining Company. Only a small percentage of the men who registered were actually called up for military service. Less than a month later, in July 1917, Leonard married a 33 year old divorcee called Naomi Esther Crawford. Apart from the Glenridding Roll of Honour, where he is listed as a Corporal but with no regiment name, we have not found any records of his war time service. Leonard was granted US citizenship in November 1918. 

When the 1920 US Census was taken, he and Naomi were living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, where Leonard was working as a foreman in the auto-mobile manufacturing industry. In July 1920, Leonard's parents and youngest brother Sidney crossed the Atlantic on board the SS Aquitania, stating their destination as Detroit. Travelling with them, but on a different manifest (as he had been granted citizenship in Sep 1918) was brother Ernest who gave Leonard's address in Detroit as his destination.

Ten years later, in 1930, Leonard and Naomi had moved to Livonia, a suburb of Detroit with Leonard still working as a foreman. The only other information we have for them at this time is sadly their divorce papers, filed on the 25th March 1935, by Leonard on the grounds of desertion. Naomi had contested the claim but the divorce was granted on 2nd April 1937. The divorce papers also confirm that Leonard and Naomi had no children.

The 1940 Census reveals that Leonard (who gave his age as 45 when he was actually 50) had re-married, as it shows a wife, Mary, aged 26 and a daughter, Joannie, aged 1 year. During WW2, Leonard was again required to Register for the Draft, which he did on the 27th April 1942, correctly stating his age as 52 years. These records, show that they were living at 18685 Murray Hill, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, and that he was working at the Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan. Leonard died on the 17th December 1972 aged 82, in Westland, Wayne County, Michigan and Mary in February 1991 aged 77.
 
  Research Documents:
    Census Returns:  18911901, 191119201930, 1940
    Passenger Manifest SS Mauretania dep Liverpool 10 May 1913
    US WW1 Draft Registration Card - 5 Jun 1917
    Leonard and Naomi Marriage Licence - 3 Jul 1917
    Leonard and Naomi Divorce - 2 Apr 1937

    US WW2 Draft Registration Card - 27 Apr 1942



  Private Donald MARSHALL (         )
Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private Frank NELSON (         )
Royal Flying Corps

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Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
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  Private Harold OGLETHORPE (         )
Army Service Corps

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Died:  (Age )

   
 


 
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