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Roll of Honour (P to R)



  Sergeant Harrison PATTINSON (30401)
Signals Coy. Royal Engineers

Born: 28 Feb 1885, Patterdale, Westmorland
Died: Abt May 1962, Ealing, Middlesex (Age 77)


Harrison Pattinson was the seventh of eight children born to Abraham Pattinson, a Gamekeeper of Grassthwaite How, and his wife Rebecca (nee Metcalf). Rebecca had originally married John Nixon of Cockermouth in 1868 but John died and she then married Abraham on the 1st June 1872 at St Patrick's Church. Harrison's siblings were; Joseph (1873-1873), Mary Jane (1874-), Eliza (1876-), Jessie (1878-), Abram (1880), John (1882-1882) and Glenthorne Jubilee (1888-1973). Harrison would have attended Patterdale School (he is described as a scholar aged 6 in the 1891 census). By 1901, the 16 year old Harrison was working as a “Hall Boy” at The Rectory in Arthuret, near Longtown. He must have been very good at and enjoyed life in service, as, by the time the 1911 census was taken, he was employed as a Valet to the Earl of Harewood at their London home in Belgravia (although he seems to have exaggerated his age - perhaps he thought a 29 year old valet would be regarded as more experienced than one of 26). Also, when he enlisted in January 1915, he stated his age as 33 and his occupation as a Valet (Groom of Chambers) to Lord Ashburton at The Grange, near Winchester (a building described as 'one of the most celebrated neo-classical mansions in Britain'.

In late July 1915, Harrison married Annie King, probably at the church of St Barnabas, in Linslade, Buckinghamshire (her home village). Banns were read at St Patrick's Church in June and July.

Harrison had enlisted into the Corps. of Royal Engineers (RE). We do not know much detail about his service as we only have copies of his discharge papers, which only contain limited details of his time in the army.  After his initial training at the Depot in Purfleet where he was trained as a 'Lineman', he was posted to Egypt in February 1916 attached to a Signals Company, where he would have been responsible for laying telephone lines for command communications. His conduct record shows no offences and he rose through the ranks to become Company Quartermaster Sergeant (CQMS). Also, the London Gazette on 22nd January 1919, reported that he had been 'Mentioned in the Dispatch of General Sir E. H. H. Allenby', the commander of British Forces in Egypt and Palestine.

One interesting fact from his medical records was that he was a strapping six feet tall - which made him a giant compared to most of the men from the Dale who on average were at least 6-8 inches shorter! His medical records also tell us that he caught a bad bout of Influenza in February 1915 (whilst still in England), which, as he claimed several years later, had caused 'noises in his ears' (Tinnitus?).

Harrison was finally discharged in August 1919, giving his address as Birchwood, Albany Road, Leighton Buzzard (which is very close to Linslade where he married). His medal card shows that he was awarded the Victory Medal and the British War Medal (to which he was entitled to attach the Bronze Oak Leaf to indicate that he had been mentioned in Dispatches). Harrison died in Ealing, Middlesex, around May 1962, aged 77, and Annie, around February 1967, aged 93, also in Ealing.
 
  Research Documents:
    Census Returns: 1891, 1901, 1911
    Discharge Documents
    Medal Card



  Driver Glenthorne Jubilee PATTINSON (M2/193357)
Army Service Corps

Born: Abt Jan 1888, Patterdale, Westmorland
Died: 5 Jan 1973, Winskill, Cumberland (Age 85)




  Research Documents:
    Census Returns: 1891, 1901, 1911
    Baptism Register (Entry 398)
    Service Records (19 Pages)
    Medal Card
    Gravestone



 
Gunner John PATTINSON (161176)
Royal Field Artillery

Born: 1 Aug 1897, Hartsop, Westmorland
Died: 30 Apr 1917, Cartmel, Lancashire (Age 19)


 
John Pattinson was born on the 1st August 1897, the son of James Pattinson and his wife Margaret (nee Winder), who lived at Howe Green in Hartsop. John was baptised at St Patrick's Church on the 12th September 1897.  

From his service number we estimate that John would have enlisted some time in early 1915 and, as he was only 17 years old, he would have been placed in a Territorial Brigade based in Britain until he was old enough to be posted overseas (at that time the minimum age limit for overseas service was 19 but it was reduced to 18 in May 1916). He therefore became eligible for overseas service in May 1916. Unfortunately, after heavy losses in France, the Regular 8thBrigade RFA was broken up on the 21st May 1916, so it looks as though John had to stay in the Reserve Brigade. A new 8th Brigade RFA was formed on the 12th January 1917 but they didn't leave Britain for Mesopotamia until August 1917. We do not know the circumstances of John's death (was it an accident or illness?) but he died in Cartmel on the 30th April 1917 whilst home on leave and was buried, on the 2nd May, in St Peter's Churchyard, Field Broughton, near Grange-over-Sands, where his recently widowed mother lived. This also explains why we have been unable to find a Medal Records card for John - he didn't meet the criteria for any. John had served with The Royal Field Artillery for around two years

    For Research Documents and more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here



  Sapper Herbert PATTINSON (           )
Royal Engineers

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
  Research Documents:



  Private Alex PEARSON (          )
Border Regiment

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
  Research Documents:



  Private Edwin PEARSON (          )
Border Regiment

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 


  Research Documents:



  Sergeant Edwin Hammond PLACE ( ?  )
Scottish Rifles (The Cameronians)

Born: 20 Aug 1895, Glenridding, Westmorland
Died: Abt Nov 1972, Penrith, Cumberland (Age 77)
 
 
Edwin Hammond Place was the eldest of six children born to Matthew Place and his wife Anna (need Hammond). His father Matthew was initially employed as a Clerk at the Greenside Mine (where is father was the Lead Mine Agent) but by 1901 he had become the Company Secretary. Edwin's siblings were Louisa (1896), Nora (1898), Dorothy Jane (1900), Matthew Summers (1905) and John Richard (1908). When the 1911 Census was taken the family were living at Brown Howe in Glenridding; Edwin was still at school and Anna’s mother Mahalah was also living with them.

The Roll of Honour in Glenridding Public Hall records that he was a Sergeant in the Scottish Rifles (The Cameronians). It also, incorrectly, gives his first name as 'Edward', perhaps because he was known locally as 'Eddie'. Unfortunately, we cannot find any records relating to his military service. Many of the Scottish Rifles Battalions were formed in Hamilton (which is where he was working as a Local Government Clerk in 1923) so it's quite likely that he was also living there before the war and explains why he joined a Scottish Regiment. Several of the 'Hamilton' Battalions remained in Scotland, so even though he reached the rank of Sergeant, we cannot be certain that he served in a theatre of war and earned any medals.

After the war he returned to working in Local Government in Scotland but clearly visited Patterdale regularly, as, on the 18th of October 1923, he married Lilian Pears from Crookabeck Farm at the Wesleyan Chapel in Patterdale. Lilian gave her occupation as an 'Uncertificated Teacher' and Edwin as a Clerk working for the County Council in Hamilton, Lanarkshire. In 1945, Edwin was still working as a Local Government Officer. From at least 1970, Edwin and Lilian were living at 22, Barton View in Penrith. He died there around November 1972 at the age of 77 and his wife Lilian was still at that address in 1984 but died in Carlisle (perhaps in hospital) in January 1993 aged 95.

His father Matthew continued to work at Greenside Mine, became the Chair of the Parish Council and by 1925 had become a Justice of the Peace. He also continued his work as a Wesleyan Preacher and read the lesson at the unveiling of the Patterdale War Memorial in October 1921 (upon which was the name of his half-brother John Dewey Place who had emigrated to Canada in 1907; he returned to fight in the war but was severely wounded in August 1917 and died in Hospital a few weeks later). Matthew, Anna and daughter Dorothy were still living at Brown Howe in 1934 but later moved to 'Wyncarrol' in Beacon Square, Penrith which is where Matthew died on the 9th of October 1945 at the age of 79. Edwin's mother Anna also died in Penrith, around August 1947 aged 78.


  Research Documents:
    Photograph of Edwin Hammond Place - Aged 8 months
    Census Returns
    Parish Registers
    Matthew Place Probate - 1945
    Edwin H Place Death Register - 1972
    Lilian Place Death Regiser - 1993
    Old BT Phone Directories



Private John Dewey PLACE (234188)
8th Bn. Canadian Infantry Regiment

Born: 26 Nov 1881, Patterdale, Westmorland
Died: 6 Sep 1917, Etaples, France (Age 33)

 
 
Born on the 26th November 1883, probably at number 3 Row Head in Glenridding, John Dewey Place was the youngest son of John Place Snr., a Lead Mine Agent, and the only child of his mother Mary Ann (nee Dewey) who had married the widower John Place Snr. on the 17th of January 1882. John had a much older half-brother Matthew (who was a Wesleyan Preacher in the village) and three half-sisters, Esther, Isabella and Jane. 

It is very likely that his early education was at Patterdale School, however, his father died in September 1891 and his mother took him to live in London, where he finished his education at Tottenham Road School. In 1901 he was living in Islington with his mother and working as a Solicitor’s Clerk. He and his mother returned to the Penrith area where John became a Wesleyan Preacher with his half-brother Matthew, who was now Company Secretary of the Greenside Mine. His mother died in February 1906 and so John decided to seek a new life in Canada, probably with the support of the Wesleyans. He sailed from Liverpool in March 1907 for Halifax, Nova Scotia, stating his final destination as Toronto. 

In 1916 John was working as a farmer in Lavinia, Manitoba but on the 7th March he travelled the 200 miles to Winnipeg to sign up for the war effort. He joined the 8th Battalion of the Canadian Infantry Regiment, who were already on the Western Front as part of the Canadian 2nd Brigade, so John would have been part of a reinforcement group, probably arriving in mid 1916. So quite likely that he took part and survived the legendary battle for Vimy Ridge. In early August 1918, orders came through that a major Canadian led offensive was to begin on the 15th August to take Hill 70 north of Lens.

The Battle of Hill 70 was a localized battle between the Canadian Corps and five divisions of the German Sixth Army. The primary objective of the assault was to inflict casualties and draw German troops away from the 3
rd Battle of Ypres, rather than to capture territory. It lasted around ten days and there was extensive use of poison gas by both sides, including mustard gas. The 8th battalion itself had 400 men killed or wounded out of the 720 that took part. John was one of the wounded, with a bullet wound in his left leg, so was evacuated to the Canadian Military Hospital at Etaples on the French coast. He was initially reported as seriously ill but he never recovered and died in hospital, perhaps from Septicaemia, on the 6th September 1917 aged 33 years. No official record has been found of his medals but he would have been entitled to at least the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. He served in France for almost one and a half years.
 
    For Research Documents and a more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here



  Petty Officer Ernest PLUMMER (          )
Royal Navy

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
  Research Documents:


  Private John POOL (           )
Border Regiment

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 
Border Regiment, Machine Gun Corps, Tank Regiment
 
  Research Documents:



 
Private George READSHAW (2462)
6th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

Born: 25 Feb 1883, Glenridding, Westmorland
Died: 21 Sep 1915, Bailleul, Nord, France (Age 33 )

George Readshaw was the fourth son of Paul Readshaw, a Lead Miner at the Greenside Mine, and his wife Ann (nee Oliver). Paul and Ann had moved to Glenridding from Weardale around 1880. The family were still living in Glenridding when the 1891 census was taken, so George would have certainly begun his education at Patterdale School. However, we know that George completed his studies at Benfieldside School in Consett, so the family must have moved back to County Durham sometime before 1897.  On the 26thJanuary 1901, his father Paul, who was a Shifter at the Medomsley Busty Pit, died of a heart attack whilst travelling out of the pit at the end of his shift - he was aged 56. So a couple of months later when the 1901 census was taken, we find the widowed Annie living in Park Street, Consett with six of her sons, the eldest four, including George, were working in the local coal mines. Around November 1909 his mother Annie also died, so by 1911 George is now head of the household, living with younger brothers Oliver and Paul in Leadgate, County Durham - they were all coalminers, probably also working at the nearby Busty Pit. 

Towards the end of 1912 George married Esther Coombe and they had two daughters, Ellen and Edith. He had also joined the Consett Territorials and by the time war was declared was a Corporal in the local Ambulance Brigade. On the 26th August 1914, only three weeks after war was declared, George enlisted and was assigned to the 1/6th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry (DLI), which was part of the 50th (Northumbrian) Division of the Territorial Force. George is known to have volunteered for overseas service. 

When George joined them at the end of August 1914, the 1/6th Battalion were based at Ravensworth Park but had moved to Newcastle by October.  Early in April, having spent six months training, the 1/6th Battalion were in billets at Gateshead, awaiting orders to join the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France. The orders arrived and on the 19thApril the Battalion, left Newcastle by train for Folkestone. They arrived the same day and immediately embarked for Boulogne, arriving about midnight. The following day the Battalion travelled by train from Pont de Briques Station to Cassel, Nord (about 50 miles) before marching to their billets at Hardifort, arriving at 5am on the 21st April. On the 23rd April orders were received to march at very short notice to Steenvoorde, from there they went by buses to Vlamertinghe to join with forces fighting on the 'Ypres Salient' in Flanders. It was now evident that the lessons which the Battalion had learnt during its long period of training were very soon to be put into practice. Sunday, the 25th April, was the first day spent by the Battalion in the trenches and the next day took part in an action in which 42 men of the Battalion died -just seven days after leaving Newcastle. 

During the next 8 weeks George would have taken part in several actions, experienced heavy shelling and gas attacks.The battalion was finally relieved on the 18th of June but they didn't get much rest; two days later they were marching south to Danoutre and on the same evening were back in the trenches. A few weeks later on the 16th July, the Battalion marched further south to Houplines close to Armentières in France. The sector proved to be very quiet and the trenches exceptionally good. Even so, they did come under shell fire and it was during one of these attacks that George was wounded. He was taken to the No.8 Casualty Clearing Station at Bailleul, but sadly died the following day the 21st September 1915. George is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France.
 
   For Research Documents and a more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here




Private Oliver READSHAW (24554)
14th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry

Born: Abt Aug 1885, Glenridding, Westmorland
Died: 23 Oct 1915, Belgium (Age 30)

 
Oliver Readshaw was the fifth son of Paul Readshaw, a Lead Miner at the Greenside Mine, and his wife Ann (nee Oliver) and was baptised at St Patrick's Church on the 18th October 1885. Paul and Ann had moved to Glenridding from Weardale around 1880. The family were still living in Glenridding when the 1891 census was taken, so Oliver would have certainly begun his education at Patterdale School but would have completed his studies at Benfieldside School in Consett, when the family moved back to County Durham sometime before 1897.  On the 26thJanuary 1901, his father Paul, who was a Shifter at the Medomsley Busty Pit, died of a heart attack whilst travelling out of the pit at the end of his shift - he was aged 56. So a couple of months later when the 1901 census was taken, we find the widowed Annie living in Park Street, Consett with six of her sons, the eldest four, including Oliver, were working in the local coal mines. Around November 1909 his mother Annie also died, so by 1911 he is found living with his brothers George and Paul in Leadgate, County Durham - they were all coalminers, probably also working at the nearby Busty Pit. 

Just a few weeks after war was declared, Oliver enlisted at Barnard Castle and was assigned to the 14th (Service) Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry (DLI). During the third week of September 1914, 1110 men travelled south to temporary billets in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. By the 3rd of October the Battalion had moved to nearby Halton Park where they linked up with the 15th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry. The battalion trained during the following weeks in weather that was described as "wretched". At this time uniforms were in such short supply that many of the men were still in civilian clothing. At the beginning of December 1914 the battalion moved to High Wycombe into billets that were described as an immense improvement. Marching back to Halton Park in April 1915 the Battalion found a big improvement in the accommodation they had left in December. Training continued amongst the Chiltern Hills until 21stJuly when they marched to Witley Camp in Surrey, a distance of 75 miles which was covered in 5 days. The Battalion continued to train hard in hot and dusty weather in the weeks before embarkation.

After training for almost 12 months in the South of England the 14th Battalion Durham Light Infantry, now part of the 64th Brigade of the 21st Division, embarked at Folkestone on the 11th September 1915. They landed in France, at Boulogne, the next morning and immediately entrained for the Saint Omer district, where most of the new divisions were prepared for services in the line. The 14th Battalion's first experience of total war took place within two weeks, when, on the 25th September 1915, they were moved up into reserve trenches on the Loos battlefield and up to the front line the next day. The Battle of Loos lasted until the 18th October and casualties where heavy, with both sides using poison gas. The 14th Battalion casualties alone during this period were horrific with over 270 listed as killed, wounded or 'missing'. They were relieved before the end of September and we can find no evidence of any further front line action for the 14th Bn. up to the date on which Oliver is reported to have died - it could be that he was wounded around the 26th/27th September and died from those wounds on the 23rd October 1915. The photograph of Oliver above is taken from a local (North-East) newspaper article reporting his death, unfortunately very little text was visible; if that article can be found we may learn more about the circumstances of Oliver's death.
 
   For Research Documents and a more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here



  Private John Henry ROBERTS (1941 & 325150)
1/9th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry

Born: 19 Oct 1894, Pendragon Castle, Glenridding, Westmorland
Died: Abt Nov 1981, Gateshead (RD), Tyne and Wear (Age 87)

 
John Henry Roberts was the eldest son of Isaac and Mary Eleanor Roberts. Isaac was born in Holywell in Wales but had moved, around 1892, from the Lead Mines at Brynford in Flintshire to Glenridding where he worked as a Lead Miner at the Greenside Mine. On the 19th of May 1894, Isaac married Mary Eleanor Pattinson at St Patrick's Church, she was the daughter of Matthew Pattinson a Stone Mason. The couple lived with Mary's parents at Pendragon Castle in Glenridding until the late 1890's when they moved to Low Rake nearby. John's siblings were; James Wilson (1895), Rose Anna (1897) and Isaac Ellis (1902). When 1911 Census was taken, both John and his younger brother James were working as Lead Ore Washers at Greenside. However, at some point during the next few years the family moved to the North East to work in the Coal Mines of County Durham. The Roberts family settled in Crawcrook, Ryton-on-Tyne, Co Durham, to work at one of the three mines operated by the Stella Coal Company in the Ryton area (Stargate, Towneley 'Emma' or the smallest, coincidentally, called 'Greenside'). John worked at the 'Emma' Colliery.

Fortunately, John's Service Record has survived and shows that he enlisted with the 9th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry on the 8th of April 1914 and was assigned to 'D' Company. This was a territorial force but on the 5th August 1914, the day after Britain declared war on Germany, he was embodied into the regular army. He would have done his initial training in Gateshead before embarking for Boulogne in France on the 19th of April 1915. On the 14th May 1915, the Battalion joined the 151st Brigade, part of the 50th (Northumbrian) Division who were fighting around Ypres. Within days, John was at the front and during the Battle of Bellewaarde (24th – 25th May), the Germans released a gas attack along a 7km front. John suffered from this gas attack and was evacuated to the No. 4 Stationary Hospital in St Omer. John was in hospital for almost two months before he was able to rejoin his unit in the field on the 20th July. At some point (the date is not readable in his service record), John was posted to the 50th Division Headquarters and given the duty of Batman to the Deputy Assistant Director of Ordnance. He remained in this post until the end of the war and was able to get two weeks home leave in mid September 1918, most likely to attend the funeral of his father Isaac who died around that time.

He arrived back in England on the 28th of December 1918 and 'disembodied' from the Army on the 3rd of February 1919. He returned to the family home at 5 Chamberlain Street, Crawcrook, Ryton-on-Tyne, Co Durham. We do not know if John married. If he did marry, we have identified three possible partners; Doris Turner (1923), Mary E Dudgeon (1923) or Lottie Chambers (1926).


  Research Documents:
    Census Returns
    Patterdale Baptism Records
    Service Records
    Medal Index Card
    Medal Roll



  Sapper Eric ROBERTS (          )
Royal Engineers

Born:
Died:  (Age )

   
 

 
  Research Documents:



  Private James Wilson ROBERTS 
205422 1/4th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment
245386 10th then 1/5th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry
51052 1st Battalion, Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

Born: 16 Oct 1895, Pendragon Castle, Glenridding, Westmorland

Died:  Abt Aug 1980, Northumberland (Age 84 )

James Wilson Roberts was the second son of Isaac and Mary Eleanor Roberts. Isaac was born in Holywell in Wales but had moved, around 1892, from the Lead Mines at Brynford in Flintshire to Glenridding where he worked as a Lead Miner at the Greenside Mine. On the 19th of May 1894, Isaac married Mary Eleanor Pattinson at St Patrick's Church, she was the daughter of Matthew Pattinson a Stone Mason. The couple lived with Mary's parents at Pendragon Castle in Glenridding until the late 1890's when they moved to Low Rake nearby. James's siblings were; John Henry (1894), Rose Anna (1897) and Isaac Ellis (1902). When 1911 Census was taken, both James and his elder brother John were working as Lead Ore Washers at Greenside. However, at some point during the next few years the family moved to the North East to work in the Coal Mines of County Durham. The Roberts family settled in Crawcrook, Ryton-on-Tyne, Co Durham, to work at one of the three mines operated by the Stella Coal Company in the Ryton area (Stargate, Towneley 'Emma' or the smallest, coincidentally, called 'Greenside').

James's detailed service records have not survived so we cannot be certain when he enlisted or where he served. His medal records however do provide some clues. When war was declared in August 1914, James was almost 19 years old and still single, so a prime target for recruitment. His medal roll shows that the first regiment he joined was the 1/4th (Territorial) Battalion of the East Yorkshires, who recruited in Hull; however this Battalion were sent to France in April 1915, so if James had been with them, he would have qualified for the 1915 Star Medal. Another fact to consider is that his service number with them of 205422 is in the new series that was introduced when the Territorials were renumbered at the start of 1917. This at least tells us that he was with the 1/4th Bn. EYR at that time. So, he may well have enlisted in the EYR at the start of the war but was held in reserve (perhaps because coal mining was important to the war effort). When he was eventually mobilised, he was re-assigned to the 10th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry (it's the DLI uniform he is wearing in the photograph above, almost certainly taken in England before he left). During 1917, the 10th DLI took part in the Battles of Arras, Scarpe, Menin Road and Paschendaele. In February 1918, following heavy losses the 10th DLI were disbanded, which is probably when James was transferred to the 1/5th DLI, who were part of the 151st Brigade of the 50th (Northumbrian Division), by July 1918 they also had suffered heavy losses and were reduced to cadre strength. Once again, this could be when James was transferred finally to the 1st Battalion of the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Considering battles he took part in, he was very lucky to survive the war. He was demobilised on the 3rd of February 1919.

After the war, around August 1920, James married Florence Willis in the Hexham (RD). Florence, was born in Crawbrook, where the Roberts family had settled. We believe that James and Florence had two daughters. Sadly Florence died in 1939 at the young age of 39 but James lived to the grand age of 84 before he died around August 1980 in the Northumberland (RD).

  Research Documents:
    Census Returns
    Patterdale Baptism Records
    Medal Index Card
    Medal Roll



  2nd Lt. Albert Watson ROTHERY, MC, MM.
Yorkshire Regiment; Machine Gun Corps; Royal Tank Corps

Born: Abt Oct 1881, Patterdale, Westmorland
Died: 29 Nov 1952, Carlisle, Cumberland (Age 70)


Albert Watson Rothery was born around October 1881 in Patterdale, the illegitimate son of Mary Watson. Mary married Moses Rothery, a Husbandman residing at the Township in Patterdale, at St Patrick's Church on the 15th February 1883. He attended Patterdale School and trained as an apprentice plumber before departing in 1907 to join the Shanghai Water Works Company.

On the outbreak of war he returned home and joined the 10th Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment in December 1914. He was promoted to Lance Corporal and then joined the Machine Gun Corps. He was again promoted to Sergeant, winning the Military Medal for his actions at the Battle of the Somme in July 1916. He recommended for a commission and entered Office Cadet School in July 1917, being commissioned into the Tank Corps in December 1917. In August 1918 he won the Military Cross. His citation reads

On 8th August, 1918, during operations east of Amiens, in spite of a thick mist, by personally guiding his Tank, he maintained his direction and proved of great assistance to the infantry. He also, when other Tanks were out of action, went forward alone and tackled and destroyed machine-gun posts. This took place when he could see other Tanks around him destroyed by shell fire. Throughout the operations he showed himself to be full of determination, courage and initiative.

On the 28th December 1918 the Cumberland & Westmorland Herald noted that he was the first “old boy” of Patterdale School to win the Military medal and only one to win the Military Cross. After the war Albert returned to the Shanghai Water Works until his retirement in 1934 with his wife Mary, whom he married in London in March 1915. After his retirement he returned to Cumbria, settling in Carlisle where he remained until his death in 1952 aged 70.

He is commemorated on the Glenridding Village Hall Roll of Honour and his name has a cross against it, which usually signifies someone who died in the war, even though Albert survived. His son Raymond lived in Carlisle. 

  Research Documents:



  Sergeant Albert ROUTLEDGE MM (16011)
7th Battalion, Border Regiment

Born: 26 Mar 1894, Great Strickland, 
Died: Mar 1980, Carlisle (Age 86 )




 
  Research Documents:



 
Driver John ROUTLEDGE (M2/131719)
Motor Transport Coy. Army Service Corps

Born: Jan 1891, Kirkoswald, Cumberland
Died: 3 Dec 1918, Basra, Mesopotamia (Age 27)


John Routledge was the second youngest of 7 children born to Thomas Routledge and his wife Jane (nee Clapham). Looking at the birthplaces of their children it seems they had moved about quite a bit, living for short periods in various parts of Yorkshire, Westmorland and Cumberland but around the late 1890’s they finally settled at Noran Bank Farm in Patterdale, where Thomas farmed as well as making boots and shoes. It is believed that John attended Patterdale School and later, at the age of 20, he is shown in the 1911 census to be working as ‘Boots’ at one of the local hotels (probably at the prestigious Gelderd’s Family Hotel – now the Patterdale Hotel). 

On the 11th October 1915, a few months after his younger brother Albert had enlisted, John went to Keswick to join up. He must have learned to drive before this as he stated his occupation as ‘Petrol Motor Driver’, a skill that, not surprisingly, got him into the 596th Mechanised Transport Company of the Army Service Corps as a Driver. Within a month he was on a ship bound for Alexandria in Egypt and the HQ of the British Expeditionary Force (Mediterranean). He was soon posted to Mesopotamia, arriving there just before Christmas 1915. The force fighting in Mesopotamia was principally one of the Indian Army, with only one solely British formation, the 13th (Western) Division, however the Indian formations also contained some British units. Conditions in Mesopotamia almost defy description, with extremes of temperature (50oC was common), arid desert, regular flooding, flies, mosquitoes and other vermin all led to appalling levels of sickness and death through disease. John was in Mesopotamia until, in mid September 1916, he was posted to India for a couple of months (his service records do not show whereabouts in India he was stationed) but returned to Mesopotamia around November 1916 and stayed there until he died in December 1918. 

We do not know what type of vehicle John would have driven. Most probably a truck of the type shown in this picture, perhaps an ambulance or if he was lucky an senior officer's staff car.

In October 1918 his parents had received an official telegram letting them know that John was seriously ill with pneumonia. They heard nothing more until they received another telegram which informed them that John had died on the 3rd December 1918 in a hospital in Basra. Mesopotamia (Basra is now in modern day Iraq). His service records note that he died of Septicaemia. 
 
   For Research Documents and a more detailed biography, see his War Memorial Page Click Here